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King Kazma
King Kazma
Marisol. 22. cis heterosexual female POC. I like ice cream and dragons and art. I blog a lot of multifandom stuff, namely Revolutionary Girl Utena, Dangan Ronpa, Sailor Moon, ATLA and Puella Magi Madoka Magica. And I blog a bunch of other shit too, like nature and animals and fashion and whatever I'm really into at the time. If you need me to tag anything or just wanna talk, hit up my inbox! I sometimes post about my depression with the tag #depression blogging.

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5centsapound:

Andrew Putter: Native Work (Capetown, South Africa)

Gallery Statement:

This new installation comprises 21 black-and-white photographs of contemporary black Capetonians….




mockeryd:

yamino:

forgetpolitics:

megustamemes:

[qozop]

this is adorable

The last two are so cute I want to cry

Cuteeeee


under: #art #photography #cool


fuckyeahlgbtqartists:

The Pink Choice

Even though many people seem to be open about homosexuality, it turned out to be untrue when I showed people photos of homosexual couples in intimate moments. Most of them found the photos disgusting and unacceptable. This reaction was a source of inspiration to me. My goal was to make photos about homosexuals that incite feelings of romantic love that is natural and beautiful. I chose to capture casual daily activities of the couples that can be familiar to anyone. By doing so, I hope to make the audience become interested, then gradually empathize with homosexual people.

Many projects/artworks on homosexuality in Vietnam tend to focus on either deviances (especially in movies, with images of homosexuals portrayed in ridiculous clothing and make-up, mincing, shrewish or rude manners…) or symbolic images. In photography, homosexuals are not presented as themselves in pictures. And if they are, they’re usually photographed from behind or with masks on. These all foster weird and absurd images of homosexuals rather then present more understanding perspectives. In turn, homosexuals become even more intimidated and isolated.

The Pink Choice has a different approach as it seeks out personal stories using direct language: documentary photography to capture real moments and real people.

Moreover, stories about homosexuality in Vietnam and also in the world usually end in tragedy, especially in movies. On one hand, this tragic style of storytelling can make audience become more sympathetic and understanding of the difficulties that homosexuals experience. On the other hand, the drama of homosexuals can also cause misunderstandings that lives of homosexuals are vulnerable and regretful, and that the choice to “come out” is an incredible effort against the community’s way of life. The point is, in real life, there are many homosexual people who live happily with their identity. There are homosexual couples who love, nurture and build a happy family life together.

The Pink Choice is a series of photos about the love of homosexual couples which focus on living spaces, the affectionate touches, and more importantly, the synchronized rhythm of lovers sharing life together. Viewers may not feel the personalities of the subjects in the photos, but hopefully they can feel the warmth of their love and caring. In way, I wanted to show what I see of homosexual people and not how they see themselves.

Photographer: Maika Elan
Website: www.maikaelan.com

Maika is respresented by MoST. If you’d like to find out more about them you should click here.




Claire's fancy-pants HISTORICAL FASHION MASTER POST 

breebird33:

shoomlah:

image

So my historical costuming resources list from 2011 was less than a page long- I’m not saying that I’ve learned a lot in the past three years, but this list is now sitting pretty at a solid nine pages.  Whew.  And people wonder why I want to redo this damn series.

This list is by no means an exhaustive one- it’s a list of (primarily western) historical fashion resources, both online and offline, that is limited to what I know, own, or use!  It’s a work in progress, and I’m definitely hoping to expand on it as my knowledge base grows.  First things first, how about a little:

ADVICE FOR RESEARCHING HISTORICAL FASHION

  • Read, and read about more than just costuming.  Allowing yourself to understand the cultural and historical context surrounding the clothing of a particular region/period can be invaluable in sussing out good costume design.  Looking at pictures is all well and good, but reading about societal pressures, about construction techniques, daily routines, local symbolism, whatever else will really help you understand the rhyme and reason behind costuming from any given context.
  • Expand your costume vocabulary.  When you’re delving into a new topic, costuming or otherwise, picking up new terminology is essential to proper understanding and furthering your research.  Write down or take note of terms as you come across them- google them, look up synonyms, and use those words as a jumping off point for more research.  What’s a wire rebato?  How does it differ from a supportasse?  Inquiring minds want to know.
  • Double-check your sources.  Especially on the internet, and double especially on tumblr.  I love it, but it’s ground zero for rapidly spreading misinformation.  Books are usually your safest bet, but also take into account their date of publication, who’s writing them- an author’s biases can severely mangle their original source material.
  • Don’t be afraid to ask for help.  Do everything you can to find out information on your own, but feel free to reach out to people with more specialized areas of knowledge for help!  Be considerate about it- the people you’re asking are busy as well- but a specific line of questioning that proves you’re passionate and that you respect their subject matter expertise can work wonders.

Okay, onto the links!

image

It’s impossible to overstate the importance of getting off the internet and looking into books!  God bless the internet, but books are (generally, this isn’t a rule) better-researched and better-sourced.  Bibliographies also mean each individual books can be a jumping off point for further research, which is always a fantastic thing.

Remember- owning books is awesome and you should absolutely assemble your own library of resources, but LIBRARIES.  Libraries.  You’ll be surprised to find what books are available to you at your local library.

GENERAL / SURVEYS

Patterns fo Fashion books
Detailed, hand-drawn diagrams of historical fashion, inside and out.  Pretty amazing stuff.

Fashion in Detail books
Not what you want if you’re looking for photos of entire costumes- note the “in detail” bit up there.  Just a beautiful series, and great reference for all the little things you might miss otherwise.  The V&A has an amazing fashion collection, and it’s great to see them share it with the world.

image

Read More

THANK YOU CLAIRE!!!!!




shyxashx0115:

fasterpussycatgifgif:

Paper sculptures by Li Hongbo.

This is extremely horrifying to watch when tipsy.




ancientart:

So who was the Mesopotamian goddess Ishtar? And What do her representations in ancient art tell us about her?
Ishtar was the Babylonian and Assyrian goddess of war and love, and had close affiliation with the Sumerian goddess Inanna. Most often she was viewed as the daughter of Antum (an earth goddess) and Anu (the sky god), with a shepherd called Tammuz her primary consort (who, according to some accounts, also happened to be her son). 
The Babylonians, Sumerians and Assyrians arose in the fourth millennium BCE onwards in the area between the Euphrates and the Tigris rivers. As these civilizations began to form, Inanna became the primary goddess of Sumer (mainly in the south), with the Babylonian Ishtar later becoming dominant in the north.
Ishtar and Inanna draw many similarities to other ancient goddesses father afield, such as Aphrodite in Greece, Isis in Egypt, and Venus in Rome. What these goddesses share is an association to love, more specifically, sex; some also shared an association to war. This dual role could possibly represent the governing of both birth and death.
In ancient art, our earliest known symbol related to Ishtar is the reed bundle. The Uruk Trough, found in southern Iraq, and dates to the Late Prehistoric period (about 3300-3000 BC) shows an example of this -note the bundle of reeds projecting from the hut. This symbol likely reflects her association with fertility. Another symbol of Ishtar is the lion, as shown on the Ishtar Gate, constructed about 575 BC under King Nebuchadnezzar II.
The image used at the top of the post is a detail from the Burney Relief, also referred to as the Queen of the Night Relief (you can check out the full artwork here), which is thought to depict Ishtar. Likely a shrine, this Old Babylonian relief was found in southern Iraq, and dates to 1800-1750 BC. As a symbol of her divinity, Ishtar holds a ring and rod of justice. The background of this relief was originally painted black, suggesting her association with the night. 
The shown relief is currently located & courtesy of the British Museum, London, photo via the Wiki Commons, taken by Fæ.
When writing up this post Marshall Cavendish’s Gods, Goddesses, and Mythology, Volume 6 (2005) was of great use, as was the British Museum’s website when talking about the Queen of the Night Relief.

ancientart:

So who was the Mesopotamian goddess Ishtar? And What do her representations in ancient art tell us about her?

Ishtar was the Babylonian and Assyrian goddess of war and love, and had close affiliation with the Sumerian goddess Inanna. Most often she was viewed as the daughter of Antum (an earth goddess) and Anu (the sky god), with a shepherd called Tammuz her primary consort (who, according to some accounts, also happened to be her son). 

The Babylonians, Sumerians and Assyrians arose in the fourth millennium BCE onwards in the area between the Euphrates and the Tigris rivers. As these civilizations began to form, Inanna became the primary goddess of Sumer (mainly in the south), with the Babylonian Ishtar later becoming dominant in the north.

Ishtar and Inanna draw many similarities to other ancient goddesses father afield, such as Aphrodite in Greece, Isis in Egypt, and Venus in Rome. What these goddesses share is an association to love, more specifically, sex; some also shared an association to war. This dual role could possibly represent the governing of both birth and death.

In ancient art, our earliest known symbol related to Ishtar is the reed bundle. The Uruk Trough, found in southern Iraq, and dates to the Late Prehistoric period (about 3300-3000 BC) shows an example of this -note the bundle of reeds projecting from the hut. This symbol likely reflects her association with fertility. Another symbol of Ishtar is the lion, as shown on the Ishtar Gate, constructed about 575 BC under King Nebuchadnezzar II.

The image used at the top of the post is a detail from the Burney Relief, also referred to as the Queen of the Night Relief (you can check out the full artwork here), which is thought to depict Ishtar. Likely a shrine, this Old Babylonian relief was found in southern Iraq, and dates to 1800-1750 BC. As a symbol of her divinity, Ishtar holds a ring and rod of justice. The background of this relief was originally painted black, suggesting her association with the night. 

The shown relief is currently located & courtesy of the British Museum, London, photo via the Wiki Commons, taken by .

When writing up this post Marshall Cavendish’s Gods, Goddesses, and Mythology, Volume 6 (2005) was of great use, as was the British Museum’s website when talking about the Queen of the Night Relief.


under: #art #history #mythology


"How many times have people used a pen or paintbrush because they couldn’t pull the trigger?" - Virginia Woolf, from Selected Essays   (via fawun)


under: #quotes #art #violence


reyairia:

wandaventham:

"selfie culture" seems so tame by comparison when you realize that not only did old timey rich people spend a fortune commissioning artists to paint flattering images of them, they spent many hours sitting for these portraits

who’s the me generation now

image

#art museums are actually just full of renaissance selfies this post just changed my life




lalage:

Drops In The Ocean v2.0 (click link to read the whole comic)

Originally published in (mostly) black and white for CF2010, this is the redrawn/coloured version I did earlier this year to match all the other Boris & Lalage comics which are in colour. I won’t be printing this as a mini - might want to collect all these short stories into a bigger book some day - but I still have some of the original copies (I like how the whale sharks look in black and white more actually)

I’ll put up a store after CF, I’m struggling to finish a new comic rn T_T drawing is ok but writing is so hard, I want to be a cheesecake


under: #comics #art


seventypercentethanol:

the only girl I ever loved, was born with roses in her eyes
but then they buried her alive, one evening 1945. [x]

N  M  H

seventypercentethanol:

the only girl I ever loved, was born with roses in her eyes

but then they buried her alive, one evening 1945. [x]

N  M  H